Overweight/Obesity Is Common in T1D and a Risk Factor for Double Diabetes

Pavankumar Kamat

Disclosures

October 12, 2021

Takeaway

  • Overweight/obesity was very common in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and was associated with double diabetes (DD).

  • Body mass index (BMI) was positively associated with total daily insulin dose in patients with T1DM.

  • DD was linked to an adverse cardiovascular risk profile and was common in lean patients with T1DM.

Why this matters

  • Findings warrant further research to determine the effects of overweight/obesity in patients with T1DM and whether weight loss can improve diabetes-related outcomes in this population.

Study design

  • This cross-sectional study included 107 consecutive patients with T1DM who attended the Young Adult Diabetes Clinic (age, 18-25 years) and the General Adult Diabetes Clinic (age, >25 years) between January and November 2019.

  • An estimated glucose disposal rate (eGDR) was used as a marker of insulin resistance, and an eGDR of <8 was used to identify individuals with DD.

  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 57/107 (53.3%; overweight, 30/107 [28%]; obesity, 27/107 [25.2%]).

  • Compared with those with normal BMI, patients with T1DM and overweight/obesity had:

    • longer diabetes duration (15.0 vs 9.5 years);

    • higher total daily insulin dose (60 vs 42); and

    • higher DD prevalence (48/57 [84.2%] vs 14/50 [28%]; P<.05 for all).

  • A moderate association was noted between an increase in BMI and total daily insulin dose (rho=0.55; P<.01).

  • Patients with DD vs those without were older, had a longer duration of diabetes, higher glycated haemoglobin and more adverse lipid profile and microalbuminuria.

Limitations

  • Retrospective design.
     

Cantley NW, Lonnen K, Kyrou I, Tahrani AA, Kahal H. The association between overweight/obesity and double diabetes in adults with type 1 diabetes; a cross-sectional study. BMC Endocr Disord. 2021;21(1):187. doi: 10.1186/s12902-021-00851-1. PMID: 34530819.  View full text

This clinical summary originally appeared on Univadis, part of the Medscape Professional Network.

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