A Retrospective Analysis of Triptan and DHE Use for Basilar and Hemiplegic Migraine

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAHS; Regina Krel, MD; Bhuvin Buddhdev, MD; Hossein Ansari, MD; Shivang G. Joshi, MD, MPH, RPh; Warren D. Spinner, DO; Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA

Disclosures

Headache. 2016;56(5):841-848. 

In This Article

Results

The study included 45 patients who received triptans and 35 patients who received intravenous DHE. In the triptan group with an age range of 18–69, 40 were included in the BM subtype and 5 were in HM. In the DHE group with an age range of 16–57, 27 were included in BM subtype and 8 were in HM. No adverse events of stroke or myocardial infarction were reported during routine follow-up appointments after initial adminstration. In the triptan group, 5 patients reported adverse effects that included GI upset, rash, neck dystonia, nightmares, and flushing. In DHE group, 5 patients had adverse events that included chest tightness, dystonic reaction, transient asymptomatic anterior T wave inversion, and agitation. Data regarding basilar symptoms, hemiplegic symptoms, triptans utilized, presence of non-basilar aura, prophylactic agents, and adverse events are detailed in Table 3, Table 4, Table 5, Table 6, Table 7, Table 8, Table 9, Table 10, Table 11 and Table 12. As there were no vascular events among the 67 patients with BM, a 95% upper bound on the rate of occurrence is 4.5%. Hence, with no events in 67 patients the event rate could statistically be as high as 4.5%. As there were no vascular events among the 13 patients with HM, a 95% upper bound on the rate of occurrence is 23%. Hence, with no events in 13 patients the event rate could statistically be as high as 23%.

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