Zachary D. Chonka, BS; Douglas P. Beall, MD; Bryan T. Jennings, MD; Dee H. Wu, PhD; Justin Q. Ly, MD; James D. Wolff, MD

Disclosures

Appl Radiol. 2004;33(9) 

In This Article

Diagnosis and Imaging Findings

Apert's syndrome.

Imaging features of Apert's syndrome include craniosynostosis of the coronal sutures with brachycephaly of the calvarium, maxillary hypoplasia, and a depressed nasal bridge (Figure 1), in addition to polydactyly and syndactyly involving both the hands and feet (Figures 2 and 3).

(A and B) Radiographs of the skull reveal craniosynostosis of the coronal sutures with brachycephaly of the calvarium, maxillary hypoplasia, and a depressed nasal bridge.

(A and B) Radiographs of the skull reveal craniosynostosis of the coronal sutures with brachycephaly of the calvarium, maxillary hypoplasia, and a depressed nasal bridge.

Radiographs of the feet show polydactyly and symmetric syndactyly of the metatarsals and phalanges comprising the first toe bilaterally.

Radiographs of the hand reveal cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers with osseous syndactyly of the phalanges of the third and fourth digits.

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