Which medications in the drug class Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used in the treatment of Sacroiliac Joint Injury?

Updated: Jan 16, 2019
  • Author: Andrew L Sherman, MD, MS; Chief Editor: Sherwin SW Ho, MD  more...
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Answer

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

NSAIDs work by decreasing inflammatory reactions and providing direct pain relief. Numerous choices are available, and they are separated into different families of agents. If an NSAID is ineffective, another agent from a different family can often provide relief. Efficacy and adverse effect profiles differ among agents and families.

Cyclooxygenase (COX)–2 inhibitors had been shown to reduce certain adverse effects (eg, gastrointestinal [GI] bleeding) and provide similar efficacy to standard agents. Unfortunately, 2 of the 3 agents (ie, rofecoxib [Vioxx], valdecoxib [Bextra]) were voluntarily removed from the market by their parent companies when an increased potential risk of adverse cardiovascular events was identified in an increased number of patients taking the drugs. Dosing requirements are usually individualized, based on the individual patient and patient response.

Celecoxib (Celebrex)

DOC for patients with mild to moderate pain. Inhibits inflammatory reactions and pain by decreasing prostaglandin synthesis.

Ibuprofen (Motrin, Ibuprin)

DOC for patients with mild to moderate pain. Inhibits inflammatory reactions and pain by decreasing prostaglandin synthesis.

Naproxen (Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn)

Common NSAID family used for relief of mild to moderate pain.

Ketorolac (Toradol)

Used primarily for control of hyperacute severe pain. Potency is higher than other NSAIDs, and use results in more marked GI upset, platelet inhibition, and renal effects.


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