When is inpatient care indicated for the treatment of agammaglobulinemia (hypogammaglobulinemia)?

Updated: Jul 08, 2019
  • Author: Donald A Person, MD, FAAP, FACR; Chief Editor: Harumi Jyonouchi, MD  more...
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Answer

Hospitalization has become unusual for patients with antibody deficiencies because home health organizations can provide intravenous antibiotics, pulmonary care, and nutritional interventions on an outpatient basis. Ig replacement therapy with either IVIG administered in outpatient clinics or SCIG at home to minimize interruptions of daily living is the mainstay of medical treatment.

The rationale for hospitalizing patients with immunodeficiency who are receiving IVIG replacement is usually to provide an adequate workup of a puzzling infection, to manage severe GI issues, to address acute pulmonary decompensation in the presence of chronic pulmonary disease, or to assess and treat severe autoimmune disorders.

Compared with others, patients who are treated have fewer acute overwhelming infections that require hospitalization.


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