What is the role of JAK and NAK inhibitors in the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-2019)?

Updated: Jun 25, 2021
  • Author: David J Cennimo, MD, FAAP, FACP, FIDSA, AAHIVS; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD  more...
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Answer

Drugs that target numb-associated kinase (NAK) may mitigate systemic and alveolar inflammation in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia by inhibiting essential cytokine signaling involved in immune-mediated inflammatory response. In particular, NAK inhibition has been shown to reduce viral infection in vitro. ACE2 receptors are a point of cellular entry by COVID-19, which is then expressed in lung AT2 alveolar epithelial cells. A known regulator of endocytosis is the AP2-associated protein kinase-1 (AAK1). The ability to disrupt AAK1 may interrupt intracellular entry of the virus. Baricitinib (Olumiant; Eli Lilly Co), a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor, is also identified as a NAK inhibitor with a particularly high affinity for AAK1. [184]   [185]   [186]   Emergency use authorization EUA was issued by the FDA for baricitinib on November 19, 2020. The EUA is for use, in combination with remdesivir, for treatment of suspected or laboratory confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in hospitalized patients aged 2 years and older who require supplemental oxygen, invasive mechanical ventilation, or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). [187]  

The NIAID Adaptive Covid-19 Treatment Trial (ACTT-2) evaluated the combination of baricitinib (4 mg PO daily up to 14 days) and remdesivir (100 mg IV daily up to 10 days) compared with remdesivir alone. The multinational trial included 1033 patients (515 received baricitinib plus remdesivir and 518 received control [remdesivir plus placebo]). Results demonstrated patients who received baricitinib had a median time to recovery of 7 days compared with 8 days with control (P = 0.03), and a 30% higher odds of improvement in clinical status at day 15. Additionally, those receiving high-flow oxygen or noninvasive ventilation at enrollment had a time to recovery of 10 days with combination treatment and 18 days with control (rate ratio for recovery, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.08). The 28-day mortality was 5.1% in the combination group and 7.8% in the control group (hazard ratio for death, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.39 to 1.09). Incidence of serious adverse events were less frequent in the combination group than in the control group (16.0% vs. 21.0%; P = 0.03) There were also fewer new infections in patients who received baricitinib (5.9% vs. 11.2%; P =0 .003). [188]  


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