What are age-related data for pediatric patients with acute pyelonephritis (kidney infection)?

Updated: Jul 01, 2021
  • Author: Tibor Fulop, MD, PhD, FACP, FASN; Chief Editor: Vecihi Batuman, MD, FASN  more...
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Answer

Age-related data adapted from Harwood-Nuss and colleagues and Hansson and colleagues are presented below in Table 5. [43, 44]

Table 5. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections (Open Table in a new window)

 

Neonates

Infants 6 weeks to 3 years of age

Children 3-6 years of age

Children 6-11 years of age

UTI frequency (%)

1

1.5-3

1.5-3

1.2

Female-to-male ratio

1:1.5

10:1

10:1

30:1

Route of infection

Blood

Ascending

Ascending

Ascending

Signs and symptoms

Failure to thrive, fever, hypothermia, irritability, jaundice, poor feeding, sepsis, vomiting

Diarrhea, failure to thrive, fever, irritability, poor feeding, strong-smelling urine, vomiting

Abdominal pain, dysuria, enuresis, fever, gross hematuria, meningismus, strong-smelling urine, urinary urgency, urinary frequency, vomiting

Dysuria, enuresis, fever, flank pain or tenderness, urinary urgency, urinary frequency

Predominant organism

Klebsiella species

E coli

E coliProteus species in older boys

E coli

Management

Admit for intravenous ampicillin and gentamicin and further evaluation

Admit for intravenous ampicillin and gentamicin and further evaluation

Follow adult guidelines, but avoid fluoroquinolones, which are theoretically contraindicated due to potential effects on the musculoskeletal system

Follow adult guidelines, but avoid fluoroquinolones, which are theoretically contraindicated due to potential effects on the musculoskeletal system

 

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