What is the prevalence of neuromotor deficits following pediatric ECMO?

Updated: Dec 21, 2017
  • Author: Edwin Rodriguez-Cruz, MD; Chief Editor: Stuart Berger, MD  more...
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Answer

Answer

Neuromotor deficits range from mild hypotonia to gross motor delay and spastic quadriparesis. Glass and colleagues compared the neurodevelopmental outcome of 103 neonates following ECMO and 37 neonates without ECMO at 5 age years [21] ; the mean full-scale, verbal, and performance intelligence quotient (IQ) scores of children who received ECMO treatment were within the normal range. As a group, however, the scores were significantly lower than in children who had not had ECMO (96 vs 115). Major disability, which was defined as mental disability, motor disability, sensorineural impairment, or seizure disorder, was present in 17 of children in whom ECMO had been used.

Other studies have proven that the neurodevelopmental outcome of the ECMO cohort is comparable to other high-risk neonatal groups and similar to neonates with the same condition managed conventionally.


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